Pinholes: Traveling through the Curtain of the Night (episode #49)

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Synopsis:

The brilliant scientist, Portage McPeeve, does not want to take over the world.

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He’s discovered a way to travel the stars, using them as gateways into other realities. With his Gateway Manipulator, he hopes to rule all the worlds of the multi-verse with an iron fist. However, when his beloved kitten becomes lost through the machine, he does not hesitate to cast plans for multi-world domination aside; instead, he follows her through the cosmos – encountering zombies, higher education for Supers, Greek gods, and killer ninjas along the way.

Will Portage find Mrs. Bumblefrost before it’s too late?

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Episode #49

The Professor poured over his calculations. Color had been absent from his life ever since he had left it behind him. Instead, the Ghost Realm provided the means for him to mentally create the things he had always desired. All the things he desired, save one – but that would be remedied soon. There was enough willpower here to move worlds, but without sufficient energy resources…

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He looked around the colorless room. White walls, filled with pale, translucent versions of the things he had possessed in life – or at least coveted possessing when he had been alive. Even the calculations he created on the paper before him were mere shadows. The ectoplasmic world he had chosen was made up of never-ending layers of translucent things upon other translucent things; the more things overlapped, the less translucent they became. The Machine (capitalization was justified for a work of this magnificence), into which he poured the bulk of his willpower, was shaped by his imagination. But what good did all his scheming do while he lacked the resources to make them solidify and interact with other worlds?

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He often questioned why he had chosen such drab surroundings, but of course he knew why. What were his alternatives? He knew the types of existence most evildoers endured after death. Evildoers? Ha! A petty label given to men of vision by small-minded fools who lacked the drive, intelligence, and will to change the status quo.

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But the afterlives had their own status quo as well. Even the more pleasant afterlife choices would have been hell to a man like himself. Forget the person he had spent a lifetime becoming? Or better yet, spend the rest of time in worship and adoration of a greater being… Greater? Ha! He’d show everyone that he, Professor Pansy McPeeve, was the greatest mind to ever exist!

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His ancestors, not to mention his descendants, lacked his supreme vision. First of all, his son, Mary, aspired to conquer the Earth but only managed to increase the gastric distress of the masses. At least Mary’s son, Portage – the Professor’s grandson, had a slightly grander vision. But even ruling the multi-verse didn’t compare to the Professor’s own ultimate goal – to conquer Death itself.

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Spiritualism, contrary to popular belief, was not irreconcilable with the practice of science. The belief that the spirits of the dead can interact with the living was something that could be tested, evidence gathered, and a case built. Over his lifetime, Professor Pansy McPeeve had gathered evidence, researched lore, and compiled his theories concerning the existence of ectoplasm – the substance by which the dead interact with those yet living.

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Of course, his scientific contemporaries would have laughed at him had they known what he really worked on. He was able to mask his true goal with something more mundane. When he invented the first pair of fluorescent bellbottoms in the 60’s, his contemporaries in the supervillain community praised it as one of the most psychologically disturbing things ever created, a huge leap forward in demoralizing the populace for ultimate subjugation. However, when he had gathered sufficient evidence to present his ectoplasmic theory, then he would reveal his real triumph to his scientific peers – or the closest approximation since none were as inspired as himself.

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Meanwhile, he continued his spiritualist investigations. Evidence was refuted time and again, but little did debunkers realize the “hoaxes” they uncovered were purposely inept. Magazine pictures with the folds still intact glued to bits of cheesecloth and photographed? The Professor marvelled at how gullible the public was. Half believed the pictures to be authentic, the other half fell into the trap and believed spiritualism itself to be false. Did they really think that spiritualists could come up with nothing better than grainy photographs and amateurish special effects? What better way to throw off the general public than to give them the hoaxes they expected? Those who lacked sufficient intelligence and the vision to seek eternal truths were not worthy to receive them.

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But Pansy was.

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The Professor had died before completing his greatest work but eternal rest held no appeal for Pansy McPeeve. Despite his current ectoplasmic state, or rather because of it, he continued building his Machine, the end goal of his life’s work. Death was the stroke of luck he needed, giving him the last bit of required insight. Then, through dreams, he subliminally influenced his son, Mary, into developing the serum.

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Pansy’s son thought he was devising a mere hyperintelligence formula. He had no idea he was developing the perfect ectoplasmic conduit; increased intelligence was a side-effect, not the object of the process. Pansy felt no need to let his son in on the real situation.

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Besides, when the Ghost Realm occupied a place among the living realms, he would explain it to his slow-witted offspring. Sometimes family was a burden, but as Pansy had realized both during his life and after, they could occasionally be made useful. Thankfully, his son Mary’s unconscious was malleable enough for Pansy to program.

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His grandson, Portage, hadn’t needed the push that his father had. Already open to the possibility of other worlds, though stubbornly refusing to accept evidence of the supernatural… Well, Pansy supposed he had a point. The things lesser minds called supernatural were not outside nature; they were an intrinsic part of nature.

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Which led Pansy’s thoughts back to the present. The creature, the perfect endoplasmic conduit, had finally been developed. His son and grandson had proved themselves useful, and he would find a place for them in the new order once his grand design was accomplished.

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All he needed for his glorious scheme to succeed was one small black kitten.

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**All episodes listed here.

**Look for the next exciting installment of Pinholes next Tuesday, same cat-time, same cat-channel… uh, blog. I mean, blog.

 

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4 Comments

Filed under Flash Fiction, Pinholes: Traveling through the Curtain of the Night, satire, scifi, Serials/Series, Super Villians/Mad Scientists

4 Responses to Pinholes: Traveling through the Curtain of the Night (episode #49)

  1. Oh nooooo! Portage hurry and and find that kitten before your made scientist grandfather does. Bites nails on both hands……

  2. oh sugar auto correct strikes again! made scientist should read mad :(

  3. Oh wow, the plot doth thicken! I wonder if the connection between Mrs. Bumblefrost and Portage will have some kind of effect here.

    Whew, finally got around to catching up! It’s been an interesting travelogue…

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